Career Services

Professional Development Workshops

There are no refunds on Professional Development Workshops.

Workshops on job hunting, portfolio and résumé preparation, and other professional-development topics are offered on Wednesday, February 22–Saturday, February 25, on Level 2 of the Los Angeles Convention Center.

Enrolling in a Workshop

A limited amount of workshop tickets are still available. Through Monday, February 13, you can register for the following workshops over the phone at 212-691-1051 ext.1 or onsite beginning Tuesday, February 21 at 5:00 PM.

  • Driving from Adjunct to Full-Time Teaching: Making Your Part-Time Experiences Work for You
  • Grant Writing for Artists
  • Job Hunt 101: Essential Steps in Securing a Job in the Arts
  • Advice for New Instructors
  • Clarifying the Digital Image: Considerations for the Submission of Images for Grants, Exhibitions, and Employment
  • Staying on Track with the Tenure Track
  • Marketing Yourself to Market Your Art

Wednesday, February 22

Driving from Adjunct to Full-Time Teaching: Making Your Part-Time Experiences Work for You
9:00–11:00 AM
Presenter: Susan Altman, Middlesex County College
Limit: 50 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 510, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

Driving from job to job? Unsure about how to take the next step to a full-time position? This workshop will help you to use your varied experiences to reach your professional goals in academia. We will discuss many relevant issues regarding the job search including practical approaches to finding a full-time position, preparation of materials, working as an adjunct in a large (or small) department, and how to maximize your experience and strengths. Whether you are looking for a studio or art history position, this workshop will help you prepare for the next step in your career.


Grant Writing for Artists
9:30 AM–NOON
Presenter: Barbara Bernstein, Rhode Island School of Design and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts
Limit: 50 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 512, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

This workshop demystifies the process of grant writing for both individual artists and collaborative projects. In a step-by-step approach, it covers the complete cycle of grant writing, including preparative research, interaction with funders, budget development, writing proposals, and assessment of the process. This information is equally useful for residency and research applications. This information is equally useful for residency and research applications.


Job Hunt 101: Essential Steps in Securing a Job in the Arts
2:30–4:30 PM
Presenter: David M. Sokol, Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois, Chicago
Limit: 100 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 510, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

Learn the essentials of a successful job hunt in the arts. This workshop is valuable for both artists and art historians; it is scheduled at the beginning of the conference because it offers good preparation for Career Services, guiding you through professional practices of the job search, including interview etiquette, preparation of materials, follow up, and other essential information to prepare you for your next job opportunity, especially a first job in teaching, museum work, or alternative careers. This is the time to ask the questions you have always wondered about concerning the ins and outs of looking for a job in the arts.


Thursday, February 23

Advice for New Instructors
2:30–4:00 PM
Presenter: Mika Cho, California State University, Los Angeles
Limit: 75 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 510, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

As with any new position, beginning and/or inexperienced instructors in higher education will find challenges to be both exhilarating and perhaps initially overwhelming. Negotiating matters such as pedagogical performance, the collegial support system, student evaluations, professional development, and the retention and tenure process can all prove daunting. Issues to be presented and discussed include the following: constructing an effective syllabus; interaction with students, colleagues, and administrators; the importance of university policy on ownership of instructional and professional materials; plagiarism, student disabilities, grievances, and sexual harassment; and grading and student evaluation.


Friday, February 24

SOLD OUT
The Syllabus: Mapping Out Your Semester

9:30–11:30 AM
Presenter: Steven Bleicher, Coastal Carolina University
Limit: 20 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 510, Level 2

The syllabus is a contract with the student. It should clearly state what is expected of the student and the professor’s requirements for the course. In addition, various accrediting bodies and associations have their own requirements that may need to be addressed. Learn what should go into a syllabus and how to break down the course content into individual class sessions. The components of an effective lesson plan, and how to use it as a successful teaching document, will also be discussed. Issues to be addressed include how much can actually be accomplished in a single class period, what homework and/or preparations are needed for the next class session, classroom management issues, and strategies for success. A well-constructed syllabus can be a valuable teaching tool and an aid to the faculty member regarding student grade disputes. This course is invaluable for graduate TAs, recent MFA graduates who have just landed their first teaching positions, and anyone who would like a refresher on the finer points of setting up the term’s classes.


Clarifying the Digital Image: Considerations for the Submission of Images for Grants, Exhibitions, and Employment
9:30–11:30 AM
Presenter: Blaise Tobia, Drexel University
Limit: 40 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 512, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

Digital still images have become the transactional standard of the visual arts. Film slides are becoming a rare means of illustration in the classroom, and virtually every arts employment or grant application requires the submission of images in digital form. But, despite the ubiquity of the medium, there remains a great deal of confusion when it comes to specifics. What is a “JPEG” file, exactly? What is image resolution, and how should it be specified? How are print resolution and screen resolution related? What are color profiles and are they important? How does this apply to PowerPoint? What are best methods for scanning existing images? Should archival digital files be kept in a specific format? This workshop will answer these questions in detail and will help both those who need to set image parameters and those attempting to meet the expectations to do so optimally.


Staying on Track with the Tenure Track
2:00–4:00 PM
Presenter: Michael Aurbach, Vanderbilt University
Limit: 40 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 510, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

Now that barely 30 percent of teaching positions are held by tenured and tenure-track faculty, a successful probationary period (pretenure) is even more important. Since the academic world is fluid (because of frequent changes of administrators and university policies), tenure-track faculty need to develop sound strategies to make the most of the probationary period. The workshop covers the documentation of one’s activities, gaining an understanding of terms like regional, national, and international recognition, developing nationwide relationships in preparation for the tenure review, and identifying nonadversarial ways of getting clarification of job expectations. Some institutions are great at identifying their criteria for promotion, yet others lag behind due to frequent changes in leadership and shifting thresholds for tenure. This session is useful for both studio faculty and art historians who hold tenure-track positions. Those who are seeking a tenure-track position will find it interesting as well.


Marketing Yourself to Market Your Art
2:00–4:30 PM
Presenter: Susan Schear, ArtIsIn
Limit: 50 participants
Price: $45
West Hall Meeting Room 512, Level 2
REGISTER ONSITE

Are you comfortable “getting out there” to meet and speak about your work? How might you engage someone in conversation? What types of questions might you ask? How might you share or inform people about your work? What marketing strategies have been most successful for you? How much time do you allocate to marketing yourself and your art? Planning and goal setting, knowing your target market, being aware of the external environment, realizing your strengths, being open to potential affinity opportunities, and considering all the different strategies for marketing, are significantly beneficial to your marketing success. Please join us during this interactive session as we address the basics of marketing, and discuss maximizing goals and implementing strategies that result in positive outcomes. Come prepared to share ideas, expertise, and recommendations that have worked for you!


Saturday, February 25

Sold Out
Art History in the Digital Age: A Hands-On Workshop
9:00–11:00 AM
Presenters: Craig Dietrich, Tara McPherson, Nick Mirzoeff, and Joan Saab
Limit: 25 participants.
Free and open to the public, but registration is required.
West Hall Meeting Room 510, Level 2

This free workshop invites participants to consider the possibilities for their work of emerging forms of digital scholarship. Participants will consider how digital platforms permit them to create media-rich and interactive publications that bring scholarly analysis and visual media together in lively and engaging ways. At the heart of the workshop is a hands-on introduction to the digital authoring platform, Scalar, a project funded by the Mellon Foundation as part of the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture. Participants must bring a laptop with wireless capability to the workshop.